Google Scholar Citations

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David
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Google Scholar Citations

Postby David » Thu Dec 01, 2011 12:46 am

Hi All,

I was recently made aware that Google Scholar now offers a capability similar to that of ISI WebOfKnowledge - tracking one's citations, h-index, manuscripts, etc. Originally, this was offered to a limited number of researchers in varying fields, but it has now been tested and is available to the general public. It takes a moment to sign up and find articles which are actually yours, but then it will compile the relevant statistical information mentioned above, as well as providing i10, which is the number of articles with 10 or greater citations. In addition, this allows you to post your profile publicly, making it easier for people to find you than with ISI, where multiple authors may have the same name and one must then root through the different author lists, combine, etc. to find whom they really want. Finally, and what I think might be the greatest advantage, is the fact that the searches are run using Google, which means that many citations which would never be found on ISI are found in Google Scholar. These include citations found within application manuals from companies, dissertations, and other media which are not routinely searched by ISI.

http://scholar.google.com/intl/en/scholar/citations.html


Happy citation hunting,

david

Craig
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Postby Craig » Thu Dec 01, 2011 9:42 am

ResearcherID is another tool for accomplishing the same thing. It is a free service from Thomson Reuters (the people behind ISI Web of Knowledge). It allows you to add your papers and track citations. It is quite a bit more stringent than Google Scholar, as David mentioned. But it is a much more convenient way of tracking publications than doing a search every time.

David
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Postby David » Thu Dec 01, 2011 11:42 pm

Hi Craig,

Actually, once you set up your Google Scholar Citations account, then you can set it up to be automatically updated, including adding new publications to your list. Also, since you have given the algorithm an idea of what field you typically publish in, then it should be more accurate than ISI in terms of the papers that it attributes to you. So, there is no need to do a search every time. :-)

daniswan
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Papers for Windows

Postby daniswan » Sat Feb 18, 2012 11:10 am

Hey all you PC users - the software Papers (http://www.mekentosj.com/papers/) is now available for Windows. It's some nice software that helps you manage the papers you have downloaded, you can save highlighted regions, and does citations in a bunch of different programs (Word, powerpoint, etc.). It's not free, but there is a free 30-day trial.

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Doug
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Postby Doug » Sat Feb 18, 2012 11:46 am

Good suggestion.

FYI, I use Papers for a Mac and love it. I keep the library in a Dropbox folder and so I can easily access Papers from multiple computers. Papers is smart enough to know when a second computer has accessed the library and will quit Papers on the first computer.

Craig
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Postby Craig » Sat Feb 18, 2012 5:53 pm

Mendeley is an option worth considering too. It is free and cross-platform (Windows, Mac, Linux). I have never used Papers but I think it is similar to Mendeley, i.e. like EndNote but with more focus on organizing research articles than citations.

aky
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Postby aky » Tue Sep 04, 2012 6:05 am

I too use Mendeley and like it. And Google Scholar citations seem to be better than ResearcherID. Scholar has also started providing suggestions based on your citations and publications.

Another useful site to maintain your list of publications is http://publicationslist.org and you can even use Pubmed's "My Bibliography" feature.


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